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"Old Sherwood Town" is only nine blocks in size, yet it represents a very large chunk of what America was about during the turn of the 19th Century. The physical Trail winds through these nine blocks. It begins and ends at the Sherwood Heritage Center. (Also take a look at our 2006 Web Page!)

Back When it was All Trees

Blue Bonnet steps out of the shadows just long enough to warn us not to make so much noise. Clyde List's advice is: "When you approach Blue Bonnet, do not look him straight in the eye. Do not make any sudden moves. Mountain men like Blue Bonnet have little use for human company. They are more coyote or grisly bear than human."
On the Oregon Trail in 1843-- "There was a scarcity of game about or near the road. The hunters had to go some distance from the road in search of game. On one occasion one of our hunters Bennett O'Neal a tall thin rawboned individual got off his horse to shoot some game and his horse ran off and left him. He got lost and wandered round until he struck the road back of the train after being out eight days, overtook the wagons. During the time he was lost he subsisted on herbs, and roots such scraps as he could pick." --Joseph Hess Memoir 1847

"The whites are determined to settle on your land. We cannot prevent them and in a few years there will be no place left for you. Then what will you do? Will you live in the mountains like wolves? The deer and other game being killed off you will have nothing to eat, your women and children crying for food, and freezing from cold; there will be no one to care for you. I tell you this will be so. Then be wise. Take good counsel. Sell your lands. Agree to remove to such places as the Government may hereafter select for you, where they will protect you and provide for your wants." --Letter from Superintendent of Indian Affairs Joel Palmer to the Chiefs and Head Men of the Tualatin Band of the Calapooia Indians. March 21, 1854

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

The idea of selling the land was a difficult idea. Some of the natives had checks from the federal government in their trunks long after they died.They did not know what the paper stood for.

Anonymous said...

Now there's a fella I have not seen for a long time--Ol'e Blue!He would hang around Butteville to see where his grain was going. One day, he got on the steamboat and went down river with his wheat. Then he watched them mill it up in stumptown. When he was satisfied with that, he went back home. Needless to say, I am back from Dayton.--John Brown

Lilly Morgen said...

Hello, Mistar John Brown. Welcome back to our side of the hill. I need a large table built for my cabin. Will trade for several pairs of winter socks. Bring yer feet over to Middleton so's I can size 'em up!

Anonymous said...

Why does the Mountain manlook like a indian??

Anonymous said...

What is his suit made out of?

Anonymous said...

why can't you make noise?

Anonymous said...

Where did the Indians live?

Lilly Morgen said...

The Mountain Man came out west of the Mississippi River to trap furs, especially the beaver pelts which were being made into hats in England.There were many trapping for the French and English. There were free trappers too who sold pelts to whoever they could. He work buckskin which is deer or elk hide. This ideas was from the Plains Indians. You see the Mountain Man studied the Indian so he could survive in the mountains and woods.

Anonymous said...

The Question was: "Why can't you make noise?"

The Bennett O'Neal story tells why. You'll scare the game.

On top of that, if you're a Mountain Man you know there's nothing you want to hear less than the voice of another human being. The critters make far better sense when they talk to you. And far better company too.

Things for Sale at the Museum

A Place in Time by June Reynolds
History Book $30
Christmas Chair by June Reynolds
Reynolds Fiction
Heritage Trail Guide by Clyde List Trail Guide
The Folks CD The Folks
Sherwood Centennial Cook Book 100 Year Cook Book
Renaissance Singers CD Renaissance Singers
Melody Guy CD
Melody Guy

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